Sleep Problems

Sleep Disorders

OVERVIEW: There's nothing quite like waking up after a great night of sleep, ready to face the challenges and pleasures of a brand new day. Unfortunately, sleep is often disturbed by one of several common sleep disorders. Sleep problems fall into several categories. Sometimes insomnia involves not being able to get to sleep, and sometimes it means you can't stay asleep. Sometimes you can sleep like a log, but are risking other health problems, as in teeth grinding, sleep walking, or sleep apnea, in which you stop breathing while you are asleep.

CAUSES: The causes of the various sleep disorders vary from psychological causes, like stress or depression, to physical problems like obesity. Medications can cause you to sleep too shallowly or to deeply, or can cause restless legs. Women are more likely to suffer sleep disorders, with the hormonal cycle sometimes causing sleep problems. Alcohol or drug abuse can cause sleep disorders. Older people are much more likely to have sleep disturbances for several reasons. For one thing, they are more likely to be on medications that cause restlessness. Also, they are more likely to have other ailments, such as an overactive bladder or pain from arthritis.

SYMPTOMS: A person who is suffering with a sleep disorder is obviously going to feel tired and run down. There are some other general symptoms, like a impairment in one's productivity. Unfortunately, accidents, including car wrecks, are often the result of someone missing sleep. People who don't sleep well at night often fall asleep in front of the TV or at school. They might have trouble concentrating, and find it hard to keep from over-reacting to emotional upsets. It might be hard to remember things, and it might be impossible to keep going without a steady supply of coffee.

DIAGNOSIS: Sleep disorders can be difficult to diagnose. A person may be receiving treatment for another problem, such as depression, when in reality, a sleep disorder is causing their symptoms. Sometimes doctors don't think to consider a person's sleep habits when they are deciding on treatment for a patient. If you are seeing a doctor about a sleep problem, a good idea would be to keep a record of your sleep patterns for a week or two first, and take it to show the doctor. You will likely have a blood test to check for possible disorders, and the doctor will probably have you fill out a questionnaire, such as the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. If warranted, you might be requested to spend a night in a sleep laboratory, where the electrical activity of your brain, heart, muscles, and eyes will be monitored throughout the night.

TREATMENT OPTIONS: Treatment for sleep disorders depends on the type of disorder. In some cases, an external aid, such as a new mattress, white noise machine, or even just a pillow between the knees can make the difference between sleeping like a baby and being up and down all night. Medications are often prescribed for sleep disorders, but implementing good sleep hygiene is perhaps the most important treatment of all. Sleep hygiene refers to going to bed and getting up at the same time each day, relaxing before bedtime, and similar healthful habits.

 

Sleep Problems
Baby Sleep Problems
Bedwetting
Bruxism-Teeth Grinding
Circadian Rhythms
Disorder Of Rem Sleep
Hypersomnia
Insomnia
Jet Lag
Narcolepsy
Night Sweat
Night Terrors
Parasomnia
Periodic Limb Movement Disorder
Restless Leg Syndrome
Sleep Aids
Sleep Apnea
Sleep Devices
Sleep Paralysis
Sleepwalking
Snoring


All the information provided by Sleep-Problems.Org is just for inoformational purposes only and should not be
considered as the delivery of medical care. You should contact your physician
for diagnsing and any other medical issues.

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